KOPRI Repository

Antarctic tundra soil metagenome as useful natural resources of cold-active lignocelluolytic enzymes

Cited 0 time in wos
Cited 0 time in scopus
Metadata Downloads
Title
Antarctic tundra soil metagenome as useful natural resources of cold-active lignocelluolytic enzymes
Other Titles
남극툰드라 토양메타지놈 분석을 통한 저온활성 리그노셀룰로오즈 분해효소 탐색
Authors
오한나
박도영
성훈제
Kim, Dockyu
설우준
Keywords
Antarctica; CAZy; Metagenomics; SMRT sequencing; cold-active enzymes; lignocellulose degradation
Issue Date
2019
Citation
오한나, et al. 2019. "Antarctic tundra soil metagenome as useful natural resources of cold-active lignocelluolytic enzymes". JOURNAL OF MICROBIOLOGY, 57(10): 865-873.
Abstract
Lignocellulose composed of complex carbohydrates and aromatic heteropolymers is one of the principal materials for the production of renewable biofuels. Lignocellulose-degrading genes from cold-adapted bacteria have a potential to increase the productivity of biological treatment of lignocellulose biomass by providing a broad range of treatment temperatures. Antarctic soil metagenomes allow to access novel genes encoding for the cold-active lignocellulose-degrading enzymes, for biotechnological and industrial applications. Here, we investigated the metagenome targeting cold-adapted microbes in Antarctic organic matter-rich soil to mine lignolytic and celluloytic enzymes by performing single molecule, real-time metagenomic (SMRT) sequencing. In the assembled Antarctic metagenomic contigs with relative long reads, we found that 162 (1.42%) of total 11,436 genes were annotated as carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZy). Actinobacteria, the dominant phylum in this soil’s metagenome, possessed most of candidates of lignocellulose catabolic genes like glycoside hydrolase families (GH13, GH26, and GH5) and auxiliary activity families (AA7 and AA3). From phylogenetic relationships with cellular and environmental enzymes, several genes having potential for participating in overall lignocellulose degradation were also found. The results indicated the presence of lignocellulose-degrading bacteria in Antarctic tundra soil and the potential benefits of the lignocelluolytic enzymes as candidates for cold-adapted enzymes which will be used for the future biofuel-production industry.
URI
http://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/10081
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12275-019-9217-1
Files in This Item
There are no files associated with this item.
General Conditions
      ROMEO Green
    Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
      ROMEO Blue
    Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
      ROMEO Yellow
    Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
      ROMEO White
    Archiving not formally supported

    Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

    Browse