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Chemosynthetic bacterial signatures in Frenulata tubeworm Oligobrachia sp. in an active mud volcano of the Canadian Beaufort Sea

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Title
Chemosynthetic bacterial signatures in Frenulata tubeworm Oligobrachia sp. in an active mud volcano of the Canadian Beaufort Sea
Other Titles
캐나다 보퍼트해 mud volcano에서 서식하는 Frenulata tubeworm Oligobrachia sp.의 화학 합성 박테리아 특성
Authors
Dong-Hun Lee
Kim, Junghyun
Lee, Yung Mi
Jin, Young Keun
Charles Paull
김다해
Kyung-Hoon Shin
Keywords
Carbon isotopic composition; Fatty acids; MIDI; Mud volcano; Sherlock microbial identification system; Siboglinid tubeworm
Issue Date
2019
Citation
Dong-Hun Lee, et al. 2019. "Chemosynthetic bacterial signatures in Frenulata tubeworm Oligobrachia sp. in an active mud volcano of the Canadian Beaufort Sea". MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES, 628(1): 95-104.
Abstract
We performed bulk and compound-specific stable carbon isotope analyses to constrain specific carbon sources utilized for the chemosynthetic metabolisms of bacterial communities inhabiting the tube and worm of Oligobrachia sp. Together with bulk carbon isotopic compositions (-57.1 ± 1.2‰, mean ± SD) observed in the worm, the most depleted 13C values of predominant fatty acids (FAs) (i.e. C16:1ω7 [-71.4 ± 2.9‰] and C18:1ω7 [-76.7 ± 4.3‰]) indicated that sulfuroxidizing symbionts were preferentially utilizing anaerobic oxidation of methane-derived dissolved inorganic carbon (-31.6 ± 4.2‰), rather than methane (-59.5 ± 3.9‰), as a carbon source. In contrast, the isotopic signatures of FAs of the tube sections indicated that both autotrophic and heterotrophic bacterial communities utilized dissolved inorganic carbon supplied from ambient bottom seawater and sediment porewater. In this regard, the metabolisms of chemosynthetic bacterial communities inhabiting the tube may be regarded as potentially supporting tubeworm nutrition. Given that the tubeworm host incorporates locally adapted microbial communities, the isotopic signatures suggest that different micro-niches identified from the tube and the worm, particularly in relation to complex metabolic interactions, may be correlated with in situ microbial processes in sediment and bottom seawater.
URI
http://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/10108
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps13084
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