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Succession of bacterial community structure during the early stage of biofilm development in the Antarctic marine environment

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Title
Succession of bacterial community structure during the early stage of biofilm development in the Antarctic marine environment
Authors
Lee, Yung Mi
Cho, Kyung Hee
Hwang, Kyuin
Kim, Eun Hye
Kim, Mincheol
Hong, Soon Gyu
Lee, Hong Kum
Keywords
Bacteroidetes; Pseudoalteromonas; Antarctica; Biofilm succession; Bacterial community; Pyrosequencing; Psychrophilic
Issue Date
2015
Citation
Lee, Yung Mi., et al. 2015. Succession of bacterial community structure during the early stage of biofilm development in the Antarctic marine environment. Korean Journal of Microbiology, 52(1): 49-58.
Abstract
Compared to planktonic bacterial populations, biofilms have distinct bacterial community structures and play important ecological roles in various aquatic environments. Despite their ecological importance in nature, bacterial community structure and its succession during biofilm development in the Antarctic marine environment have not been elucidated. In this study, the succession of bacterial community, particularly during the early stage of biofilm development, in the Antarctic marine environment was investigated by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Overall bacterial distribution in biofilms differed considerably from surrounding seawater. Relative abundance of Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes which accounted for 78.9?88.3% of bacterial community changed drastically during biofilm succession. Gammaproteobacteria became more abundant with proceeding succession (75.7% on day 4) and decreased to 46.1% on day 7. The relative abundance of Bacteroidetes showed opposite trend to Gammaproteobacteria, decreasing from the early days to the intermediate days and becoming more abundant in the later days. There were striking differences in the composition of major OTUs (≥ 1%) among samples during the early stages of biofilm formation. Gammaproteobacterial species increased until day 4, while members of Bacteroidetes, the most dominant group on day 1, decreased until day 4 and then increased again. Interestingly, Pseudoalteromonas prydzensis was predominant, accounting for up to 67.4% of the biofilm bacterial community and indicating its important roles in the biofilm development.
DOI
10.7845/kjm.2016.6005
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