KOPRI Repository

Crustal structure beneath the Northern Transantarctic Mountains and Wilkes Subglacial Basin: Implications for tectonic origins

Cited 5 time in scopus
Metadata Downloads
Title
Crustal structure beneath the Northern Transantarctic Mountains and Wilkes Subglacial Basin: Implications for tectonic origins
Other Titles
북부 남극 종단 산맥과 윌크스 분지의 지각 구조: 지체구조의 기원
Authors
Samantha E. Hansen
Andrew A. Nyblade
Park, Yongcheol
Jordan H. Graw
Lendsey M. Kenyon
Subject
Geochemistry & Geophysics
Keywords
Crust thickens; the northern TransantarcticMountains (TAMs)
Issue Date
2016
Citation
Samantha E. Hansen, et al. 2016. "Crustal structure beneath the Northern Transantarctic Mountains and Wilkes Subglacial Basin: Implications for tectonic origins". JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-SOLID EARTH, 121: 812-825.
Abstract
The Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) are the largest noncollisional mountain range on Earth. Their origin, as well as the origin of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin (WSB) along the inland side of the TAMs, has been widely debated, and a key constraint to distinguish between competing models is the underlying crustal structure. Previous investigations have examined this structure but have primarily focused on a small region of the central TAMs near Ross Island, providing little along-strike constraint. In this study, we use data from the new Transantarctic Mountains Northern Network and from five stations operated by the Korea Polar Research Institute to investigate the crustal structure beneath a previously unexplored portion of the TAMs. Using S wave receiver functions and Rayleigh wave phase velocities, crustal thickness and average crustal shear velocity (Vs) are resolved within ±4 km and ±0.1 km/s, respectively. The crust thickens from ~20 km near the Ross Sea coast to ~46 km beneath the northern TAMs, which is somewhat thicker than that imaged in previous studies beneath the central TAMs. The crust thins to ~41 km beneath the WSB. Vs ranges from ~3.1?3.9 km/s, with slower velocities near the coast. Our findings are consistent with a flexural origin for the TAMs and WSB, where these features result from broad flexure of the East Antarctic lithosphere and uplift along its western edge due to thermal conduction from hotter mantle beneath West Antarctica. Locally, thicker crust may explain the ~1 km of additional topography in the northern TAMs compared to the central TAMs.
URI
http://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/6100
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2015JB012325
Files in This Item
General Conditions
      ROMEO Green
    Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
      ROMEO Blue
    Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
      ROMEO Yellow
    Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
      ROMEO White
    Archiving not formally supported

    qrcode

    Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

    Browse