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The role of eddies in solute transport and recovery in rock fractures: implication for groundwater remediation

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Title
The role of eddies in solute transport and recovery in rock fractures: implication for groundwater remediation
Other Titles
암반 단열 내에 와류의 형성이 용질 거동 및 정화에 미치는 영향: 지하수 오염 저감 관점에서의 의미
Authors
Lee, Seung Hyoun
Lee, Won Sang
Lee, Kang-Kun
Yeo, In Wook
Keywords
eddies; immobile fluid zone; rock fracture; solute transport; visualization technique; Water Resources
Issue Date
2017
Citation
Lee, Seung Hyoun, et al. 2017. "The role of eddies in solute transport and recovery in rock fractures: implication for groundwater remediation". HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES, 31(20): 3580-3587.
Abstract
A better understanding of solute transport and retention mechanism in rock fractures has been challenging due to difficulty in their direct observations in microscale rough-walled fractures. Six representative troughs in a rough-walled fracture were selected for microscale observations of eddy formation with increasing flow velocity and its effect on spatiotemporal changes of solute concentration. This experimental study was enabled by a microscale visualization technique of micro particle image velocimetry. With increasing flow velocity (Re ≤ 2.86), no eddies were generated, and solutes along the main streamlines transported rapidly, whereas those near the wall moved slowly. A larger amount of solutes remained trapped at all troughs at Re = 2.86 than Re < 1. For Re = 8.57, weak eddies started to be developed at the troughs on the lee side, which little contributed to overall solute flushing in the fracture. Accordingly, a large of amount of water was needed for solute flushing. The flow condition of 1 < Re < 10, before a full development of eddies, was least favourable in terms of time and amount of remediation fluid required to reach a target concentration. After large eddies were fully developed at troughs on the lee side for Re = 17.13, solutes were substantially reduced by eddies with less amount of water. Fully developed eddies were found to enhance solute transport and recovery, as opposed to a general consensus that eddies trap and delay solutes. Direct inflow into troughs on the stoss side also made a great contribution to solute flushing out of the troughs. This study indicates that fully developed eddies or strong inflows at troughs are highly possible to form for Re > 10 and this flow range could be favourable for efficient remediation.
URI
http://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/6112
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hyp.11283
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