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Dinoflagellate cyst assemblages from the northern shelf sediments of the East China Sea: An indicator of marine productivity

Cited 4 time in scopus
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Title
Dinoflagellate cyst assemblages from the northern shelf sediments of the East China Sea: An indicator of marine productivity
Other Titles
고해양생산성 지시자로서의 북동중국해 와편모조류 시스트 군집 연구
Authors
Cho, Hyun-Jin
Kim, So-Youn
Lim, Dhong-il
Subject
Paleontology
Keywords
East China Sea; dinoflagellate cyst; paleoenvironments; shelf sediments
Issue Date
2012
Publisher
ELSEVIER
Citation
Cho, Hyun-Jin, Kim, So-Youn, Lim, Dhong-il. 2012. "Dinoflagellate cyst assemblages from the northern shelf sediments of the East China Sea: An indicator of marine productivity". Marine Micropaleontology, 96-97(1): 75-83.
Abstract
The dinoflagellate cyst assemblages from the northern shelf of the East China Sea were examined to assess their potential use as indicators of marine productivity in shelf environments. Coastal areas affected by fluvial freshwater input were dominated by protoperidinioid species, whereas open sea areas were dominated by gonyaulacoid species. The rarity of protoperidinioid cysts in the shelf sediment is primarily attributable to the deficit of silicate in the waters, associated with low supplies of suspended particulate matter from the adjacent continent. This would limit the growth of the protoperidinioid species, which feed on diatoms. In contrast, a constant supply of nitrogen generated by microbial nitrogen fixation appeared to support the production of gonyaulacoid species. This result suggests that gonyaulacoid dinoflagellate cysts are a potentially useful proxy indicator for low nutrient concentration levels, especially of silicate, in the shelf environment. were dominated by protoperidinioid species, whereas open sea areas were dominated by gonyaulacoid species. The rarity of protoperidinioid cysts in the shelf sediment is primarily attributable to the deficit of silicate in the waters, associated with low supplies of suspended particulate matter from the adjacent continent. This would limit the growth of the protoperidinioid species, which feed on diatoms. In contrast, a constant supply of nitrogen generated by microbial nitrogen fixation appeared to support the production of gonyaulacoid species. This result suggests that gonyaulacoid dinoflagellate cysts are a potentially useful proxy indicator for low nutrient concentration levels, especially of silicate, in the shelf environment.
URI
http://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/6286
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marmicro.2012.09.003
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