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Penguin head movement detected using small accelerometers: a proxy of prey encounter rate

Cited 23 time in scopus
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Title
Penguin head movement detected using small accelerometers: a proxy of prey encounter rate
Authors
Nobuo Kokubun
Kim, Jeong-Hoon
Akinori Takahashi
Yasuhiko Naito
Shin, Hyoung Chul
Subject
Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics
Keywords
Antarctic krill; accelerometry; chinstrap penguin; faraging effort; gentoo penguin
Issue Date
2011
Publisher
The Company of Biologists
Citation
Nobuo Kokubun, et al. 2011. "Penguin head movement detected using small accelerometers: a proxy of prey encounter rate". Journal of Experimental Biology, 214(22): 3760-3767.
Abstract
Determining temporal and spatial variation in feeding rates is essential for understanding the relationship between habitat features and the foraging behavior of top predators. In this study we examined the utility of head movement as a proxy of prey encounter rates in medium-sized Antarctic penguins, under the presumption that the birds should move their heads actively when they encounter and peck prey. A field study of free-ranging chinstrap and gentoo penguins was conducted at King George Island, Antarctica. Head movement was recorded using small accelerometers attached to the head, with simultaneous monitoring for prey encounter or body angle. The main prey was Antarctic krill (>99% in wet mass) for both species. Penguin head movement coincided with a slow change in body angle during dives. Active head movements were extracted using a high-pass filter (5Hz acceleration signals) and the remaining acceleration peaks (higher than a threshold acceleration of 1.0g) were counted. The timing of head movements coincided well with images of prey taken from the back-mounted cameras: head movement was recorded within ±2.5s of a prey image on 89.1±16.1% (N=7 trips) of images. The number of head movements varied largely among dive bouts, suggesting large temporal variations in prey encounter rates. Our results show that head movement is an effective proxy of prey encounter, and we suggest tha proxy of prey encounter rates in medium-sized Antarctic penguins, under the presumption that the birds should move their heads actively when they encounter and peck prey. A field study of free-ranging chinstrap and gentoo penguins was conducted at King George Island, Antarctica. Head movement was recorded using small accelerometers attached to the head, with simultaneous monitoring for prey encounter or body angle. The main prey was Antarctic krill (>99% in wet mass) for both species. Penguin head movement coincided with a slow change in b
URI
http://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/6458
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jeb.058263
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