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Soil organic carbon characteristics relating to geomorphologynear Vestre Lovenbreen moraine in Svalbard

Cited 2 time in scopus
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Title
Soil organic carbon characteristics relating to geomorphologynear Vestre Lovenbreen moraine in Svalbard
Other Titles
스발바르의 서로벤빙하 후퇴지역 근처에서 지형과 관련한 토양 유기탄소 특성
Authors
Jung, Ji Young
Lee, Yoo Kyung
Lee, Kyoo
Lim, Hyoun Soo
Lee, Eun Ju
Kim, Hyun-cheol
Subject
Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics
Keywords
SOC fractions; Svalbard; geomorphological features; high Arctic; soil organic carbon (SOC); vegetationestablishment
Issue Date
2014
Citation
Jung, Ji Young, et al. 2014. "Soil organic carbon characteristics relating to geomorphologynear Vestre Lovenbreen moraine in Svalbard". Journal of Ecology and Environment, 37: 69-79.
Abstract
Soil organic carbon (SOC) in the Arctic is vulnerable to climate change. However, research on SOC stored in the high Arctic regions is currently very limited. Thus, this study was aimed at understanding the distribution and characteristics of SOC with respect to geomorphology and vegetation in Svalbard. In August 2011, soil samples were collected near the Vestre Lovenbreen moraine. Sampling sites were chosen according to altitude (High, Mid, and Low) and differences in levels of vegetation establishment. Vegetation coverage, aboveground biomass, and SOC contents were measured, and density-size fractionation of SOC was conducted. The SOC content was the highest in the Mid site (126.9 mg g-1) and the lowest in the High site (32.1 mg g-1), although aboveground biomass and vegetation coverage were not different between these two sites. The low SOC content measured at the High site could be related to a slower soil development following glacial retreat. On the other hand, the Low site contained a high amount of SOC despite having low vegetative cover and a high ratio of sand particles. These incompatible relationships between SOC and vegetation in the Low site might be associated with past site disturbances such as runoff from snow/glacier melting. This study showed that geomorphological features combined with glacier retreat or melting snow/glacier effects could have affected the SOC distribution and vegetation establishment in the high Arctic.
URI
http://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/6558
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.5141/ecoenv.2014.009
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