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Isolation of Cultivable Anaerobic Bacteria from Alaska Peatlands

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Title
Isolation of Cultivable Anaerobic Bacteria from Alaska Peatlands
Other Titles
알래스카 습지에서 분리한 혐기성 박테리아
Authors
Kim, Hye Min
Lee, Yoo Kyung
Keywords
Enterococcus; Exiguobacterium sibiricum; Klebsiella; anaerobic bacteria; peatland
Issue Date
2010
Citation
Kim, Hye Min, Lee, Yoo Kyung. 2010. Isolation of Cultivable Anaerobic Bacteria from Alaska Peatlands. The University Centre in Svalbard. The University Centre in Svalbard. 2010.06.16~.
Abstract
Total 58 strains of anaerobic bacteria were isolated from soil samples collected from peatlands in Fairbanks, Alaska. The soil samples were cultured anaerobically in EM1 medium at 15°C for one month. The supernatant was inoculated on TSA agar media, and colonies were purified by four times sub-culturing on the same media at 15°C for one week. Phylogenetic analysis of the 58 strains was performed using 16S rRNA gene sequences and EZtax-on (Chun et al. 2007), and they were identified as 23 species (Table 1). The 23 species belonged to only two groups: Firmicutes and Gammaproteobacteria. Among them, five species were Enterococcus species and one species was Klebsiella. They might be originated from animals lived around the sampling site. One isolate, KOPRI 90141 showed high similarity with Exiguobacterium sibiricum 25515 isolated from the Siberian permafrost (Rodrigues et al. 2006).
URI
http://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/8077
Conference Name
The University Centre in Svalbard
Conference Place
The University Centre in Svalbard
Conference Date
2010.06.16~
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