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New particle formation events observed at the King Sejong Station, Antarctic Peninsula ? Part 2: Link with the oceanic biological activities

Cited 2 time in wos
Cited 3 time in scopus
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Title
New particle formation events observed at the King Sejong Station, Antarctic Peninsula ? Part 2: Link with the oceanic biological activities
Other Titles
남극 세종과학기지 초미세입자 형성에 관한 연구: 파트2, 해양 생물 활동과의 연관성
Authors
장은호
Park, Ki-Tae
Yoon, Young Jun
김태욱
Hong, Sang-Bum
Silvia Becagli
Rita Traversi
김재석
Gim, Yeontae
Keywords
Dimethyl sulfide; King Sejong Station; Phytoplankton; new particle formation
Issue Date
2019
Citation
장은호, et al. 2019. "New particle formation events observed at the King Sejong Station, Antarctic Peninsula ? Part 2: Link with the oceanic biological activities". ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS, 19(11): 7595-7608.
Abstract
Marine biota is an important source of atmospheric aerosol particles in the remote marine atmosphere. However, the relationship between new particle formation and marine biota is poorly quantified. Long-term observations (from 2009 to 2016) of the physical properties of atmospheric aerosol particles measured at the Antarctic Peninsula (King Sejong Station; 62.2°S, 58.8°W) and satellite-derived estimates of the biological characteristics were analyzed to identify the link between new particle formation and marine biota. New particle formation events in the Antarctic atmosphere showed distinct seasonal variations, with the highest values occurred when the air mass originated from the ocean domain during productive austral summer (December, January and February). Interestingly, new particle formation events were more frequent in the air masses that originated from the Bellingshausen Sea than in those that originated from the Weddell Sea. The monthly mean number concentration of nanoparticles (2.5?10 nm in diameter) was >2-fold when the air masses passed over the Bellingshausen Sea than the Weddell Sea, whereas the biomass of phytoplankton in the Weddell Sea was more than ~70% higher than that of the Bellingshausen Sea during the austral summer period. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is of marine origin and its oxidative products are known to be one of the major components in the formation of new particles. Both satellite-derived estimates of the biological characteristics (dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP; precursor of DMS) and phytoplankton taxonomic composition) and in situ methanesulfonic acid (84 daily measurements during the summer period in 2013 and 2014) analysis revealed that DMS(P)-rich phytoplankton were more dominant in the Bellingshausen Sea than in the Weddell Sea. Furthermore, the number concentration of nanoparticles was positively correlated with the biomass of phytoplankton during the period when DMS(P)-rich phytoplankton predominate. These results indicate that oceanic DMS emissions could play a key role in the formation of new particles; moreover, the taxonomic composition of phytoplankton could affect the formation of new particles in the Antarctic Ocean.
URI
http://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/10000
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-7595-2019
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