KOPRI Repository

Antarctic blackfin icefish genome reveals adaptations to extreme environments

Cited 19 time in wos
Cited 20 time in scopus
Metadata Downloads
Title
Antarctic blackfin icefish genome reveals adaptations to extreme environments
Other Titles
남극빙어의 유전체 분석을 통한 극한 환경 적응 기작 규명
Authors
Kim, Bo-Mi
Amores, Angel
Kang, Seunghyun
Ahn, Do Hwan
Kim, Jin-Hyoung
Kim, Il-Chan
Lee, Jun Hyuck
Lee, Sung Gu
Lee, Hyoungseok
Lee, Jong Eun
Kim, Han-Woo
Desvignes, Thomas
Batzel, Peter
Sydes, Jason
Titus, Tom
Wilson, Catherine A.
Catchen, Julian M.
Warren, Wesley C.
Schartl, Manfred
Detrich, H. William, III
John H. Postlethwait
Park, Hyun
Postlethwait, John H.
Subject
Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Evolutionary Biology
Issue Date
2019-03
Citation
Kim, Bo-Mi, et al. 2019-03. "Antarctic blackfin icefish genome reveals adaptations to extreme environments". NATURE ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION, 3(1): 469-478.
Abstract
Icefishes (suborder Notothenioidei; family Channichthyidae) are the only vertebrates that lack functional haemoglobin genes and red blood cells. Here, we report a high-quality genome assembly and linkage map for the Antarctic blackfin icefish Chaenocephalus aceratus, highlighting evolved genomic features for its unique physiology. Phylogenomic analysis revealed that Antarctic fish of the teleost suborder Notothenioidei, including icefishes, diverged from the stickleback lineage about 77 million years ago and subsequently evolved cold-adapted phenotypes as the Southern Ocean cooled to sub-zero temperatures. Our results show that genes involved in protection from ice damage, including genes encoding antifreeze glycoprotein and zona pellucida proteins, are highly expanded in the icefish genome. Furthermore, genes that encode enzymes that help to control cellular redox state, including members of the sod3 and nqo1 gene families, are expanded, probably as evolutionary adaptations to the relatively high concentration of oxygen dissolved in cold Antarctic waters. In contrast, some crucial regulators of circadian homeostasis (cry and per genes) are absent from the icefish genome, suggesting compromised control of biological rhythms in the polar light environment. The availability of the icefish genome sequence will accelerate our understanding of adaptation to extreme Antarctic environments.
URI
https://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/10832
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41559-019-0812-7
Appears in Collections  
2018-2018, Polar Genomics 101 Project: Genome analysis of polar organisms and establishment of application platform (18-18) / Kim, Jin-Hyoung (PE18080)
2017-2018, Polar Genomics 101 Project: Genome analysis of polar organisms and establishment of application platform (17-18) / Park, Hyun (PE17080; PE18080)
Files in This Item

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse