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Individual Human Recognition of Wild Animals: A Review and a Case Study in the Arctic Environment

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Title
Individual Human Recognition of Wild Animals: A Review and a Case Study in the Arctic Environment
Other Titles
야생 동물의 인간 인지 행동에 관한 리뷰 및 북극 환경에서의 사례 연구
Authors
Lee, Won Young
Choe, Jae Chun
Subject
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Keywords
Close human contact hypothesis; High cognitive abilities hypothesis; Individual human recognition; Longtailed skua; Pre-exposure to stimuli hypothesis; Ruddy turnstone
Issue Date
2020-10
Citation
Lee, Won Young. 2020. "Individual Human Recognition of Wild Animals: A Review and a Case Study in the Arctic Environment". Proceeding of National Institute of Ecology, 1(1): 1-8.
Abstract
Recent studies revealed that many animals identify individual humans. In this account, we review previous literatures on individual human recognition by wild or domestic animals and discuss the three hypotheses: “high cognitive abilities” hypothesis, “close human contact” and “pre-exposure to stimuli” hypothesis. The three hypotheses are not mutually exclusive. Close human contact hypothesis is an ultimate explanation for adaptive benefits whereas high cognitive abilities and pre-exposure to stimuli hypothesis are proximate explanations for mechanisms to perform such discriminatory behaviour. We report a case study of two bird species in a human-free habitat. Long-tailed skuas, which are known for having high cognitive abilities, exhibited the human discriminatory abilities whereas ruddy turnstones did not display such abilities toward approaching humans. This suggests that highly intelligent species may have this type of discriminatory ability so that they could learn to identify individual humans quickly by pre-exposure to stimuli, even in a human-free habitat. Here, we discuss that human recognition is more common in species with rapid learning ability and it could develop for a short period of time between an intelligent species and human.
URI
https://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/11849
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.22920/PNIE.2020.1.1.1
Appears in Collections  
2020-2020, Advancement into unexplored areas of North Greenland through paleoenvironment and animal evolution research (20-20) / Park, Tae-Yoon S. (PE20220)
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