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Observational Evidence of Distinguishable Weather Patterns for Three Types of Sudden Stratospheric Warming During Northern Winter

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Title
Observational Evidence of Distinguishable Weather Patterns for Three Types of Sudden Stratospheric Warming During Northern Winter
Other Titles
북반구 겨울철 동안 성층권 돌연승온의 세가지 유형에 따른 날씨 패턴 차이에 대한 관측적 증거
Authors
Choi, Hyesun
Kim, Joo-Hong
Kim, Baek-Min
Kim, Seong-Joong
Subject
Geology
Keywords
sudden stratospheric warming; type-transition; North America; surface temperature; cold polar air
Issue Date
2021-02
Citation
Choi, Hyesun, et al. 2021. "Observational Evidence of Distinguishable Weather Patterns for Three Types of Sudden Stratospheric Warming During Northern Winter". FRONTIERS IN EARTH SCIENCE, 9(1): 1-10.
Abstract
Sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events often lead to a cold surface air temperature anomaly over the extratropical regions. In this study, we propose, through observational evidence, that the types of SSW determine the severity of the cold anomaly. Based on the three-type classification of SSW, it is found that the surface air temperature drops notably over central to eastern North America following an SSW-type transition, especially from displacement to split. Note, however, that the differences in mean surface air temperature anomalies between SSW types are not statistically significant, even though after SSW-type transition from displacement to split, surface air temperature anomalies are colder than the other two types. The development of an anomalous tropospheric ridge in the North Pacific Arctic sector, associated with the difference in the vertical and zonal propagation of planetary waves, characterizes the post-warming period of the displacement-split type. After the occurrence of the displacement-split type transition of SSW events, upward propagation of planetary waves of zonal wavenumber 1 is suppressed, whereas planetary waves of zonal wavenumber 2 increase in the troposphere. Accompanying the ridge in the North Pacific, a trough developed downstream over North America that carries cold polar air therein. The results in this study are relevant for the subseasonal time scale, within 20 days after an SSW occurrence.
URI
https://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/11950
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/feart.2021.625868
Appears in Collections  
2021-2021, Earth System Model-based Korea Polar Prediction System (KPOPS-Earth) Development and Its Application to the High-impact Weather Events originated from the Changing Arctic Ocean and Sea Ice (21-21) / Kim, Joo-Hong (PE21010)
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