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The Far Ultraviolet Signatures of Conjugate Photoelectrons Seen by the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Spectrographic Imager

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Cited 1 time in scopus
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Title
The Far Ultraviolet Signatures of Conjugate Photoelectrons Seen by the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Spectrographic Imager
Other Titles
SSUSI 이미저에 의해 관측된 양극지 극자외선 현상
Authors
Kil, Hyosub
Schaefer, Robert K.
Paxton, Larry J.
Jee, Geonhwa
Subject
Geology
Keywords
FUV; Space environment in the northern and southern hemispheres
Issue Date
2020-01
Citation
Kil, Hyosub, et al. 2020-01. "The Far Ultraviolet Signatures of Conjugate Photoelectrons Seen by the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Spectrographic Imager". GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, 47(1): 1-8.
Abstract
This study investigates the origin of anomalous far ultraviolet emissions observed at night at the subauroral region by the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Spectrographic Imager (SSUSI) on board the Defense Meteorological Satellite System (DMSP)-F16 satellite. The global distribution of the anomalous emission is derived using the measurements of the oxygen atom 130.4 nm emission in 2017. Our results show the extension of the anomalous emission from high latitudes to middle latitudes in the Northern American-Atlantic sector during the December solstice and in the Southern Australia-New Zealand sector during the June solstice. These observations indicate that the anomalous emission occurs in the winter hemisphere and is pronounced at locations close to the magnetic poles. The good agreement between the morphology of the anomalous emission and the predicted distribution of conjugate photoelectrons leads to the conclusion that the anomalous emissions are the signatures of conjugate photoelectrons.
URI
https://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/11990
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2019GL086383
Appears in Collections  
2020-2020, Occurrence of aurora and their correlations with polar upper atmospheric and climate variabilities (20-20) / Jee, Geonhwa (PE20100)
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