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Temperature sensitivity of Antarctic soil-humic substance degradation by cold-adapted bacteria

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Title
Temperature sensitivity of Antarctic soil-humic substance degradation by cold-adapted bacteria
Other Titles
남극 토양 부식질분해의 높은 온도민감성
Authors
Kim, Dockyu
Park, Ha Ju
Kim, Mincheol
Lee, Seulah
Hong, Soon Gyu
Kim, Eungbin
Lee, Hyoungseok
Subject
Microbiology
Keywords
BARTON PENINSULACOMMUNITYFUNGI
Issue Date
2022-01
Citation
Kim, Dockyu, et al. 2022. "Temperature sensitivity of Antarctic soil-humic substance degradation by cold-adapted bacteria". ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 24(1): 265-275.
Abstract
Heteropolymer humic substances (HS) are the largest constituents of soil organic matter and are key components that affect plant and microbial growth in maritime Antarctic tundra. We investigated HS decomposition in Antarctic tundra soils from distinct sites by incubating samples at 5°C or 8°C (within a natural soil thawing temperature range of -3.8 to 9.6°C) for 90 days (average Antarctic summer period). This continuous 3-month artificial incubation maintained a higher total soil temperature than that in natural conditions. The long-term warming effects rapidly decreased HS content during the initial incubation, with no significant difference between 5°C and 8°C. In the presence of Antarctic tundra soil heterogeneity, the relative abundance of Proteobacteria (one of the major bacterial phyla in cold soil environments) increased during HS decomposition, which was more significant at 8°C than at 5°C. Contrasting this, the relative abundance of Actinobacteria (another major group) did not exhibit any significant variation. This microcosm study indicates that higher temperatures or prolonged thawing periods increase the total soil temperature and affect the relative abundance of cold-adapted bacterial communities, thereby promoting the rate of microbial HS decomposition. The resulting increase in HS-derived small metabolites will possibly accelerate warming-induced changes in the Antarctic tundra ecosystem.
URI
https://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/13544
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.15849
Type
Article
Station
King Sejong Station
Indexed
SCIE
Appears in Collections  
2021-2021, Ecophysiology of Antarctic terrestrial organisms to reveal mechanisms of adaptation to changing environment (21-21) / Lee, Hyoungseok (PE21130)
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