KOPRI Repository

The latitudinal gradient in rock-inhabiting bacterial community compositions in Victoria Land, Antarctica

Cited 3 time in wos
Cited 3 time in scopus
Metadata Downloads
Title
The latitudinal gradient in rock-inhabiting bacterial community compositions in Victoria Land, Antarctica
Other Titles
남극 빅토리아랜드 지역에서 위도구배에 따른 암석미생물 군집구조 연구
Authors
Lee, Jaejin
Cho, Junho
Cho, Yong-Joon
Cho, Ahnna
Woo, Jusun
Lee, Jong Ik
Hong, Soon Gyu
Sul, Woo Jun
Kim, Ok-Sun
Subject
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Keywords
Antarctica; Correlation; Latitudinal gradient; Machine learning; Rock-inhabiting bacterial community
Issue Date
2019-03
Citation
Lee, Jaejin, et al. 2019. "The latitudinal gradient in rock-inhabiting bacterial community compositions in Victoria Land, Antarctica". SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 657(1): 731-738.
Abstract
The harsh conditions in Victoria Land, Antarctica have formed a simple ecosystem dominated by microbes that use rocks as shelters to avoid environmental stressors. The area is composed of basement rocks that illustrate the history of complex deformation and can be an ideal environment to investigate the relationship between rock-inhabiting bacterial communities and environmental factors. Because this region is inhospitable to living organisms and receives least external, inorganics dissolved from minerals can be considered as key factors influencing rock-inhabiting bacterial communities. Thus, the present study attempted to explore rockinhabiting bacterial communities throughout Victoria Land, to identify environmental parameters that are more influential on bacterial community compositions, and to investigate latitudinal gradients in environmental parameters and rock-inhabiting bacterial communities. The results suggested that (i) rock-inhabiting bacterial communities in Victoria Land predominately consisted of either Actinobacteria or Proteobacteria; (ii) latitudinal gradients in rock-inhabiting bacterial community compositions and chemical parameters were observed; (iii) latitude, pH, nitrate, and sulfate significantly correlated with the dominant phyla; and (iv) the Classification and Regression Tree (CART) analysis demonstrated that latitude, pH, and sulfate concentrations could explain the dominant phylum with 89% accuracy. These findings can provide important insight into the link between environmental factors and rock-inhabiting bacterial community compositions in conditions with extremely cold temperatures and high levels of radiation, which could also be of interest in astrobiology.
URI
https://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/10866
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.12.073
Files in This Item
General Conditions
      ROMEO Green
    Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
      ROMEO Blue
    Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
      ROMEO Yellow
    Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
      ROMEO White
    Archiving not formally supported

    Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

    Browse